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  1. How do I hookup a one-wire alternator?
     
  2. My battery is located at the rear of the car. DO I have to run a charge wire from the alternator all the way back to the battery? Or can I hook it up to the starter solenoid?
     
  3. What is the difference in Part # 8172 (jumper one wire) and Part # 8162?
     
  4. Why did my Powermaster racing alternator not come with a pulley?
     
  5. I installed my racing alternator and in testing found it is only producing 13.6V (+ or -). Is there a problem with the alternator?
     
  6. Can I run my Powermaster racing alternator backwards?
     
  7. Can I mount the bracket kit on my engine motor plate?

How do I hookup a one-wire alternator?

Simply run a charge wire from the battery terminal on the alternator to the positive terminal on the battery (or battery side of the disconnect switch). The one wire regulator is a self-exciting regulator, meaning that it has sensing circuitry for alternator rotation. As the alternator starts to spin, this circuitry connects the internal voltage regulator to the battery and turns the alternator on. When the alternator comes to a complete stop, this same circuitry turns the alternator off.

My battery is located at the rear of the car. DO I have to run a charge wire from the alternator all the way back to the battery? Or can I hook it up to the starter solenoid?

Yes and No. As far as function is concerned, the alternator can be connected to the battery terminal on the starter solenoid. This will work fine. To shut the car off, the ignition system should be switched to stop the car.
If this is a race car, the wire or cable should be run all the way to the battery side of the disconnect switch. This means that the alternator and the battery would be on one side of the switch, and the circuits would be on the other side. In the event of an emergency, the disconnect switch could be turned off and the engine would stop. If a one wire alternator is on the circuit side of the switch and the disconnect is turned off, the motor may not stop because current is flowing from the laternator and the other circuits. Usually the tech inspection teams at most racing events will check for this as normal procedure.
Because this is such a long run in most cars (12 ft or so), be sure to use a properly sized cable for the alternators output, typically no less than 4 AWG wire.

What is the difference in Part # 8172 (jumper one wire) and Part # 8162?

There are three differences in these two units:
1) The regulator in # 8172 is not a racing one-wire regulator, but an OE regulator. It has a lower set point of 14.0VDC. The ignition terminal on the regulator is either jumpered to the alternator battery post or it is connected to the ignition switch "RUN" position. (If it is jumpered to the battery connection be sure to disconnect the battery when the engine is off for long periods, as a jumpered alternator will pull up to 300mA of standby current.)
2) The bearings in the 8172 are OE. The bearings in the 8162 are custom packed with a special lube for high speed, low drag operation.
3) The 8172 has a natural finish and the 8162 has a black thermal coat finish. This coating is a ceramic based heat dispersant coating that enables the alternator to run at a cooler temperature, thus prolonging the life of the alternator.

Why did my Powermaster racing alternator not come with a pulley?

The pulley systems and ratios in racing vary widely. Some use a matched pulley setup. Others have custom pulleys made. It is important for reliable alternator operation to establish the right pulley ratios. Typical circle track ratios are 1:1, drag racing ratios are 2:1, and street ratios are 3:1. Because of this, the alternator pulley becomes a separate consideration based on personal application. For pulley choices, please click here.

I installed my racing alternator and in testing found it is only producing 13.6V (+ or -). Is there a problem with the alternator?

Not necessarily. The voltage can be low for several reasons. First, make sure that the voltage meter is measuring accurately. Check the voltage with another quality meter. Second, consider where in the system the measurement is taken. If this voltage is at the battery, check the voltage at the alternator. If there is more than 0.40VDC difference, the problem is in the charging or ground path from the alternator to the battery. Upgrade the cables, disconnect switches and connectors. If the voltage is low at the alternator, then the alternator is not able to produce enough amps to satisfy demand at this speed. Either change the speed with different pulleys, or change the alternator to one with more output at this speed. Keep in mind that all alternators have an output curve. Some curves rise abruptly at low speed and level off. This type of winding is more for low speed operation. Other curves rise more slowly but peak at a higher point. This type of alternator is designed to run fast. It is important to tune the alternator speed to the alternators power characteristics and the vehicles amperage requirements.

Can I run my Powermaster racing alternator backwards?

Yes, they charge in either direction. Be sure to lock-tite the pulley nut on if running backwards.

Can I mount the bracket kit on my engine motor plate?

Yes. The main consideration is the drive pulley on the crankshaft. Locating the entire alternator and bracket in front of the motor plate is going to move the alternator forward as much as 2 3/4. The drive pulley becomes the engineering consideration.

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